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Episode 19: HOW, WHEN, and WHO to Reach Out To (for kidlit authors)

 

Episode 18: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/the-how-when-and-who-to-reach-out-to-episode-for-kidlit-authors

Children's authors, critique partners, and friends (Bonnie Clark and Shanda McCloskey) talk about their various personal experiences with drumming up school visit bookings. We hope you enjoy the listen!
 

Kid book review by ________.
 

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):

Where to find us:

This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, we would surely appreciate it if you would rate and review us and please share with others who might like it too! And if our podcast is helpful to you, please consider making a one-time or reoccurring donation to help keep us going!


If you have comments or even ideas for future topics to cover on an episode let us know on the contact form at AuthorVisitPodcast.com. With your help, kids can record a book review there too and it might get used as the Kid Book Review on one of our future episodes! There’s even a printable book review template there to help guide you if needed.


Thanks for listening to the 19th episode of the Author Visit Podcast!

Episode 18: All About the School Visit Section On Your Author Website

Episode 18: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/18-all-about-the-school-visit-page-on-your-author-website

Children's authors, critique partners, and friends (Bonnie Clark and Shanda McCloskey) talk about how to structure and organize the school visit section of your author website in order to book more visits! 

 

A note from Ben (web developer and producer of this podcast) on websites:

You don’t have to hire anyone to build you a website nowadays, but if do it yourself, you need to think about the structure of the site. It’s pretty easy to get a WordPress or SquareSpace or other site up and running quickly, but you really need to think through the structure of pages in general. Don’t make people think too hard about what information is where. Don’t try to be avant-garde or unique with regard to menus, navigation, and layout. Make sure the wording is clear and succinct throughout the site, especially on the author visit page. Like, put all your information out there, but try not to repeat yourself, and don’t ramble. As for SEO, make sure to title the pages with what you want to come up as in a Google search (example, mention your town or area somewhere if you want to appear in searches for author visits in that area). Most modern systems like WordPress come with themes that are already mobile friendly, but be sure to test it out and try a few different themes to get the look you’re going for. Worst case-scenario, if you break something, WordPress developers are pretty easy to come by on sites like Upwork, and there’s probably one in your area if you search for it specifically.

 

Now, let's talk about the school visit section of your site...

 

Bonnie, what’s your philosophy on this subject?

  1. Easy to read/ follow

  2. Everything you need to know about me/ my presentations 

  3. Author visits in action (me & students)

  4. Should get a good “vibe”and snapshot of my personality

  5. Testimonials (new this year!) 

  6. Accessible contact information for further questions
     

Shanda: ​​I believe that a good author-visit web page does 3 jobs:

  1. Gains trust

  2. Informs

  3. Calls to action

My author visit page is first a place to show that I welcome visit opportunities AND I have experience speaking to kids. I show this through my words, photos, and testimonials. This is the gaining trust part. 

Once the school sees evidence that I can provide an engaging program, then they will start looking for more detailed information. This is the inform part. There are links to my IN-PERSON visit packet pdf and my VIRTUAL visit packet pdf. These pdfs list my presentation menu, pricing, book sale info, and tips for a great visit. 

I update these pdfs every summer before the new school year begins. Sometimes I might remove a presentation that I’m not crazy about anymore, add a new presentation to the menu, or adjust my pricing. 

*Notes on pricing: I choose to have a price that I show plainly. It’s the same for all schools and it’s all-inclusive with travel expenses as well. I do this because I got burned before. A school had a per night hotel price cap that was outdated. So I lost hundreds of dollars by letting them “pay for my travel”. I just did a little research and built that into my price. It’s served me well so far. And schools like it because they know exactly how much my visit will cost with one simple price. I saw author Stacy MacUnulty do this on her author visit webpage. And it made so much sense to me. She actually uses a booking service now, but when she booked all her own visits like I do, she used this method. A simple, all-inclusive price for various distances- Local, Semi-local, and Beyond. I do the same.

My author visit page also has an availability calendar.  It’s a little fancy and I may have seen one other author use one, so it’s definitely NOT a must-have, but I love it.. It’s useless though if you don’t keep it up, but so awesome that schools can see immediately if a date they have in mind is clear for me or not. My husband (Ben) made this possible. I wouldn’t have done it on my own but it’s linked to a Google calendar that I solely use for this purpose by blocking off dates that are unavailable (like my kids spring break and dr appt etc.) and adding school visits as they are booked. 

Last, you need a call to action! Something that tells the school if you like what you see, do THIS to start the process. I have a contact form with the words “Let’s Plan A Visit” above it. One of the fields in my form is “how did you hear about me?” This is so interesting. I’ve learned that most schools find me through personal recommendations and plain ol Google searches.

Conclusion - Your website is a key tool to getting more school visits! If you simply and clearly put most of your info right there on your website, it’ll cut out a bunch of time-wasting back and forth emails for both parties. Just put the info schools will need to know on your website and that alone will make it that much easier to get bookings. A school who is looking at a few authors at once may choose the author that makes the process easiest to access. It’s a no brainer. Everyone is busy. Especially educators. So try to avoid sounding cryptic and secretive on your school visit webpage. You don’t want your vibe to be … I really don’t have a school visit plan or pricing in place but I’ll throw something together if you want me bad enough to jump through my hoops. 

No matter what I ‘m shopping for, if the price is hidden then that tells me - it’s probably overpriced and will be work because I’m going to need to haggle or something. 

“If you want to make school visits a larger part of your work and income, your author-visit webpage should sing that song!”    -Shanda

 

That wraps up our 18th episode!

Quote: (Bonnie) “Be the energy you want to attract.” - Buddha 
Let your website, social media, posts etc. reflect what you want to attract.
 

Kid book review by Beni.
 

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):

Where to find us:

This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, we would surely appreciate it if you would rate and review us and please share with others who might like it too! And if our podcast is helpful to you, please consider making a one-time or reoccurring donation to help keep us going!


If you have comments or even ideas for future topics to cover on an episode let us know on the contact form at AuthorVisitPodcast.com. With your help, kids can record a book review there too and it might get used as the Kid Book Review on one of our future episodes! There’s even a printable book review template there to help guide you if needed.


Thanks for listening!

Episode 17: What To Do In 2022

Episode 17: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/17-what-to-do-in-2022

 

Children's authors, critique partners, and friends (Bonnie Clark and Shanda McCloskey) look back at what worked and what didn't (school-visit wise) in 2021 in order to set new goals and improve in 2022.


Kid book review by Amera.
 

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):

 

Where to find us:

This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, we would surely appreciate it if you would rate and review us and please share with others who might like it too! And if our podcast is helpful to you, please consider making a one-time or reoccurring donation to help keep us going!


If you have comments or even ideas for future topics to cover on an episode let us know on the contact form at AuthorVisitPodcast.com. With your help, kids can record a book review there too and it might get used as the Kid Book Review on one of our future episodes! There’s even a printable book review template there to help guide you if needed.


Thanks for listening! Happy 2022!

Episode 16: Creative Add-Ons for School Visits

Episode 16: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/16-creative-add-ons-for-school-visits

 

Bonnie and Shanda interview award-winning Children's book author and national speaker, Shannon Anderson, about her experience offering creative add-ons for school visits. 

SHANNON ANDERSON IS AN AWARD-WINNING CHILDREN'S BOOK AUTHOR AND NATIONAL SPEAKER. SHE TAUGHT FOR 25 YEARS, FROM FIRST GRADE THROUGH COLLEGE LEVEL AND WAS NAMED ONE OF THE TOP 10 TEACHERS WHO INSPIRED THE TODAY SHOW. SHANNON LOVES DOING AUTHOR VISITS, PROVIDING PD FOR TEACHERS, MENTORING ASPIRING WRITERS, AND KEYNOTING AT EVENTS.


Let’s get to it! … Questions we asked Shannon:
 

  • Shannon, when we first started chatting about you joining us on the podcast, you mentioned that you had been binge listening to it. So, then I asked you what is a topic we haven’t yet discussed or discussed well on the podcast that you could help shed some light on for us, and you suggested this episode: Creative Add-ons for School Visits. So here we are! Can you give us an overview of what you mean by creative add-ons and why  are you interested in the topic ?

  • How can this benefit schools? And authors?

  • How can this help with funding?

  • You were a teacher, so what do schools need and what can they really use?

  • Are these ideas things that can be carried to the virtual realm as well?

  • Speaking of which, if you could look into your crystal ball, how do you see this school year panning out as far as authors visiting in-person again?

  • And wherever else we go with this conversation...

 

Thank you SO much for chatting with us, Shannon!


Kid book review by Laney Jones (11).
 

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):

 

Where to find us:

 

This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, we would surely appreciate it if you would rate and review us and please share with others who might like it too! And if our podcast is helpful to you, please consider making a one-time or reoccurring donation to help keep us going!


If you have comments or even ideas for future topics to cover on an episode let us know on the contact form at AuthorVisitPodcast.com. With your help, kids can record a book review there too and it might get used as the Kid Book Review on one of our future episodes! There’s even a printable book review template there to help guide you if needed.


Thanks for listening!

Episode 15: Artist In Residence Programs, A Conversation With Joyce Hesselberth

Episode 15: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/15-artist-in-residence-programs-a-conversation-with-joyce-hesselberth

 

Bonnie and Shanda interview author-illustrator, Joyce Hesselberth, about her experience doing an artist in residence program in collaboration with a school.

Joyce Hesselberth is the author-illustrator of several artful educational books including:  Mapping Sam, Pitter Pattern, and Shape Shift. Joyce also has a brand new beautiful book out called Beatrice Was A Tree.

Fun fact: Joyce is another agency sister of mine!


Let’s get to it! … Questions we asked Joyce:

  • To start, we’d love to hear about your new book, Beatrice Was A Tree, and the inspiration behind it!
     
  • So I was super intrigued when you told me you were doing an artist-in-residency with a school… What exactly is that? And can you tell us about your recent experience doing it in partnership with a school?
     
  • What (in your opinion) does the school/students benefit from a program like this vs. a one day school visit?
  • How should artists go about pricing something like this? And who sets it up … librarian, art teacher, principal, PTA? 
     
  • Have you ever heard of an “author in residence” program? And what could that look like for non-artist writers?
     
  • Joyce, do you also offer single day visits and virtual visits? And which is your favorite?
     
  • Do you have any other advice for authors, illustrators, or educators about trying an artist in residence program?
     

Thank you SO much for chatting with us, Joyce!


Kid book review by Harvey McCloskey (11).
 

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):

 

Where to find us:

 

This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, we would surely appreciate it if you would rate and review us and please share with others who might like it too!


If you have comments or even ideas for future topics to cover on an episode let us know on the contact form at AuthorVisitPodcast.com. With your help, kids can record a book review there too and it might get used as the Kid Book Review on one of our future episodes! There’s even a printable book review template there to help guide you if needed.


Thanks for listening!

Episode 14: Talking to Students about Social Emotional Learning (SEL) with Susan Verde

Episode 14: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/14-talking-to-students-about-social-emotional-learning-with-susan-verde

Bonnie and Shanda interview New York Times Best Selling Author of the I Am Series, Susan Verde, about her author visit philosophy surrounding social emotional learning (SEL).

Susan Verde, is the New York Times Best Selling Author of the “I Am” series (which were illustrated by Peter Reynolds): I Am Human, I Am Yoga, I Am Peace, I Am Love and I Am One, along with many other books and a brand new book called THE TOSSY-TURNY PRINCESS AND THE PESKY PEA! A fairy tale to help you fall asleep! (illustrated by Jay Fleck).

Fun fact: Susan and Shanda happen to have the same literary agent!

 

Let’s get to it! … Questions we asked Susan:
 

  • To start, tell us about your new book and how you came up with the topic of sleep for this one?
     

  • Ok Susan, can you give us an overview of what you typically do during a school visit and what about it is uniquely you?
     

  • Similar to Bonnie, many of your books fall in the social emotional learning (SEL) category which is a hot topic these days! What’s your SEL philosophy when presenting to kid readers?
     

  • Has your visit schedule been pretty busy this year in light of the pandemic? Did you offer virtual visits? How did that go for you?
     

  • Has a student ever brought up something uncomfortable? How did you / would you handle that?
     

  • As an educator, mother, and school presenter, what do you see as the biggest SEL need/gap right now? Any thoughts on how to bridge that gap?
     

  • Did I just imagine this or did you once tell me you used to be a kindergarten teacher?! How has that experience affected you as a presenter?
     

  • Do you consider yourself more of an introvert or an extrovert? How does that play into your visits?
     

  • How many school visits do you typically like to do a year?
     

  • Before we wrap up, do you have any last tips for our listeners (authors, educators) about school visits or SEL?


    We now know there are these social emotional pieces that are necessary for learning. - Susan Verde


This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and share it with others who might enjoy it too! Thanks for listening to this episode of the Author Visit Podcast! 

 

Kid book review by Beni McCloskey (6).

 

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):


Thanks for listening to this episode of the Author Visit Podcast!

Episode 13: Online Platforms & School Visits

Episode 13: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/13-online-platforms-school-visits

Bonnie and Shanda interview elementary school media specialist, Jennifer Lewis of Indian Knoll Elementary School, about her experience and expertise with Microsoft Teams as a virtual author visit tool.

Jennifer Lewis is the media center specialist for Indian Knoll Elementary school here in Canton, GA. This is her 24th year teaching and 10th in the media center. She’s been with Indian Knoll since the school opened ten years ago. She is very involved with the Georgia Library Media Association as part of the communications committee and she serves as their Library Media Specialist of The Year chair. 

Jennifer enjoys presenting at conferences and is a “Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert.” She was also the 2018 Georgia Library Media Specialist of the Year. 

We’re really excited to have her here with us on the podcast today and we can’t wait to hear more about all the interesting things she’s involved in. So welcome Jennifer to the podcast!

 

Hi Jennifer! You are kind of a big deal! I was very impressed with you and Indian Knoll when I did my virtual author visit back in February. Tell us a little about you and your school and what your favorite role in education is.

I love collaborating with the teachers at my school to promote reading and teach their grade level standards!  I plan lessons with teachers to support these goals.”

I work at the best school ever! We opened ten years ago and our school has always had the best community and felt like family. Many of the teachers who opened the school are still here and many of the families are also. I remember when many of our current students were born! I absolutely love my job because it is always interesting and I never have the same day twice. My job is a challenge every day in trying to serve my students and teachers the best way I can. I love collaborating with the teachers at my school to promote reading and teach their grade level standards!  I plan lessons with teachers to support these goals.  

 

You’ve told us that you are a presenter at conferences like the GALILEO and ISTE conferences. Tell us about those and what sort of topics you cover. 

This summer, I am presenting at the GALILEO Annual Conference and ISTE. My session at the GALILEO conference is about using the ebooks found within GALILEO to support standards and to personalize learning. My sessions at ISTE are about using Minecraft: Education Edition and using our learning management system to engage learners in the school library. I absolutely love learning new things at conferences and being a presenter often allows me to attend conferences I wouldn’t be able to go to otherwise!

 

I learned when I visited you that Indian Knoll is a “Microsoft Incubator School”  And you are working towards being a “Microsoft Showcase School.” Tell everyone what that means!

My school is currently a Microsoft Incubator School.  We have been working all year to raise our status to Microsoft Showcase School.  We will apply for that this summer.  Showcase Schools are basically schools that Microsoft recognizes for exceptional use of Microsoft technologies and dedication to education transformation.  Part of this has been our use of Microsoft Teams.  We have six digital teachers who use Teams for their daily instruction of students who are learning from home.  All of our teachers used Teams when school was closed due to covid.  And all of our staff has used Teams for parent conferences, IEP meetings, hosting guest readers, faculty and department meetings, author visits, technology help, etc.  With everyone using Teams so much, it helps that teachers know Teams so well and are able to navigate it easily when we have big events like author visits.  It has also been a great platform for including our digital learners who are at home.  They can connect and be a part of what is going on at school.)

 

You obviously use Microsoft Teams for a lot of different purposes. Do you see yourself using it as an option in the future even when we can go back to in-person gatherings? Maybe a hybrid approach to author visits?

I have grown to LOVE Teams! It helps us connect to people we would not otherwise have been able to connect to in ways we wouldn’t have been able to. So I definitely think (and hope) that we will continue to use Teams for author visits even after the pandemic.  Previously we used Skype to meet with authors we couldn’t see in person.  But Teams allows more participants so we can include students learning from school and from home and it has a chat feature so that students and teachers can post their questions. And the teacher can vet questions before they are asked. 😆 One thing I have learned this year is that I need to make sure I teach kids what behavior is expected and appropriate during Teams author visits just like I would for an in-person visit. I hope that in-person author visits don’t completely disappear! Having an author visit the school is pretty powerful to kids. But Teams offers a good alternative to in-person visits.

 

How do you choose authors to come visit your school? (And specifically how did you hear about Bonnie?)

The best way to learn about authors who visit schools is from colleagues. I am part of a lot of librarian groups online, and I often see posts where librarians share great authors they have hosted. I heard about Bonnie from a colleague who hosted her earlier in the year. She raved about Bonnie’s program and shared all of the positive feedback she received from her students and staff. Also, our district is in the process of developing a social emotional learning curriculum so the theme of Bonnie’s books fit that perfectly. Having a colleague who has hosted an author before is helpful because they can give me helpful information for when I host the author. For example, my colleague who hosted Bonnie first sent me an email that she sent to her staff telling them what to expect and some different Teams tips.  I was able to customize that email for my staff instead of drafting an email from scratch.

 

How do you raise funds for author visits? Book Fairs? Other?

Our book fairs are our main fundraiser! So that is usually where author visit fees come from. However, a colleague told me about how she received a Literary Events of Georgia Grant to cover Shanda’s fees. So I applied for that grant when I reached out to Bonnie about visiting my school. It was a very easy grant to apply for and completely covered the fees. I have applied for other grants to pay for authors’ fees, but this is the first one I have gotten.

 

What is your opinion as a librarian on what makes a GOOD/ successful author visit? Any particularly memorable author visit moments? Any catastrophes?

A good author visit begins at the school with me! My job is to prepare students and teachers for a visiting author. Having an author means so much more to the kids when they are familiar with the author and his/her books. So I always spend time with my students doing read alouds, sharing the author’s biography, and sometimes even purchasing books for the teachers’ classroom libraries before the visit. 

Author visits run more smoothly when they author and I have communicated well beforehand. I like to know from an author what their technology requirements are, their maximum number of students they like to have in one session, what drinks/snack they love.

And of course, an engaging program is important as well! I love the programs where authors have a program that keeps the kids’ attention through a story, a picture, a game, or something like that.  I know it’s been a good author visit if the kids bring me stories and pictures inspired by the author and if the author’s books stay checked out for the rest of the year! Bonnie’s program for Taste Your Words is an example of a memorable author visit! Bonnie does a Bean Boozled challenge based on the flavors of the words in Taste Your Words. The kids LOVED that! And now all of Bonnie’s books have been checked out of our library or placed on hold since then.

One memorable moment in an author visit was when we hosted David Biedzrycki. He is the author/illustrator of Breaking News Bear Alert, Sumo Kitty, and many other books! Before the kids arrived, he asked me to pose for a photo. Then he used his software to put my photo in the presentation. It was the part of the presentation where he was reading his book to the kids. When he got to the slide with my picture, the kids went nuts! I had read the book to them before his visit and they knew I was not supposed to be in the book! 😆 David is such an amazing presenter that he is able to get the kids back very quickly so they weren’t loud for too long!

Fortunately, I have not had any catastrophes!

 

Do you offer the visiting author’s books for sale at your visits? How does that typically work? And how do you feel about Author Visit Central now that you’ve used it?

We always offer for students to purchase our visiting authors’ books. My principal is very supportive of this. I have done this in several different ways, ranging from using a local independent bookstore to having the author ship books directly to the school and sign when he arrives.  When we hosted Bonnie in January, that was the first experience I have had with Author Visit Central. I absolutely loved it!  Everything about Author Visit Central is designed to make book sales easy. I was first impressed by the beautiful, clean flyer you sent. And all sales were done online, so I didn’t have to handle any money at all. That is definitely a plus because it always scares me when parents send in money with little guys. Because we are local, Bonnie dropped the books off at my school.  And I already had a list of students who were supposed to receive books ahead of that so I knew what to expect and delivering them was a breeze.  So I would definitely use this service again.  Media specialists always have a million things to do at any given time, so we appreciate everything that can save us a little time!

 

When you used Author Visit Central when Bonnie virtually visited, I noticed that your school families purchased a very nice number of books compared to others we’ve done in this area. How did you promote it? Whatever you did worked!

Wow! That is great! I don’t know if I did anything special! My school’s families have always been supportive of literacy promotions like author visits and the book fair. But I did several things to promote book sales. First, like I mentioned before, I promoted the books in my lessons and told kids “You can get your own copy of this book signed by the author!” If the kids have heard the books before and know how awesome they are, they are more likely to ask their parents to buy them. The beautiful flyer you created was a huge help in promoting book sales. I made copies of the form and sent it home. I also created a couple of displays where I made posters out of the flyer and the book covers and hung those in places where they would be seen by a lot of people. And last, I posted several announcements in our learning management system and on social media. The more ways we can get the message out, the better!

 

Using your crystal ball and looking through the lens of technology, how do you see authors and schools working together in the future to create mutually beneficial relationships and memorable visits for students?

There are so many things I have done differently in the past year because of covid protocols that I have thought, “Wow, why didn’t I always do it this way?” and I think Teams author visits are definitely one of those things. I also think that having a virtual relationship with an author might lead to a deeper relationship because it’s so easy to communicate online. Like the kids can send messages to an author via the teacher to have their questions answered. Or the kids can be early readers of an author’s book and show the author how their books are being used in classrooms.  

 

Is there anything else you would like to add to our discussion today?

I want to let you know how much I have enjoyed this podcast! Even though I’m probably not your intended audience, I have learned so much listening to you both! It has been helpful for me to hear about author visits from your perspective because it helps me prepare better!

 

Wrap up

Quote: Alvina Ling, senior editor at Little Brown Books For Young Readers, recently said on her podcast, Book Friends Forever episode 89, that “doing school visits is the single one best thing an author can do to help themselves”. 

This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and share it with others who might enjoy it too! Thanks for listening to our 10th episode of the Author Visit Podcast! 

Kid book review by Matthias from Sonoraville Elementary!
 

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):

Episode 12: What is Author Visit Central?

Episode 12: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/12-what-is-author-visit-central

Bonnie and Shanda talk with Ben McCloskey, (Shanda's husband) the co-creator and web developer of AuthorVisitCentral.com, about the service it provides and the gap it closes when it comes to selling books for an author visit.

 

"It's 2021, we should be able to do an author visit book sale online." -Ben McCloskey

 

"Author Visit Central alleviates 'points of pain' for several different people involved in author visit book sales." -Ben McCloskey

 

If you are an author, illustrator, librarian, educator, PTA parent, book seller, etc. and you have questions about Author Visit Central, feel free to contact Ben and Shanda at: info@authorvisitcentral.com

This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and share it with others who might enjoy it too! Thanks for listening to our 10th episode of the Author Visit Podcast! 

Kid book review by Beni (6 years old).

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):

Episode 11: What Librarians WANT

Episode 11: https://authorvisitpodcast.com/11-what-librarians-want

Cohosts, author-illustrator Shanda McCloskey and author Bonnie Clark have a conversation with elementary school librarian and media specialist, Beth Mitchell, about what makes an author visit fantastic and memorable (from her point of view).

Beth has been a media specialist for 11 years starting in South Carolina and then moving to GA. She has an outstanding husband and is the proud mother of two sweet little girls. Who they love reading with.

Beth is a "dream big" kind of librarian. She loves working alongside teachers and students to make dreams realities. In 2014 she brought Jan Brett to her school after winning an international contest! At her current school, she has brought in multiple authors, illustrators, and storytellers like, Peggy Eddleman, Shanda McCloskey,  Tim Lowry, Jerry Pallotta, John David Anderson, and Bonnie Clark. You can get in touch with Beth at: emitchell@gcbe.org

This podcast is sponsored by AuthorVisitCentral.com and produced by Ben McCloskey of EngineIndustries.com. And if you enjoyed this episode, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and share it with others who might enjoy it too! Thanks for listening to our 10th episode of the Author Visit Podcast! 

Kid book review by Paisley (3 years old)

Resources and books mentioned in this episode (with affiliate links that help support this podcast):